I’m Brigitte Lewis.

I’m glad you decided to drop in and check out what I’ve been up to.

I love all things tech, lesbian culture, social critique and penetration testing AKA ethical hacking

(including bad photoshopping and a good giggle).

This is the home of all my latest writing and projects.

I am the founder of W0m3nWhoHackM3lbourn3.

Featured Work

Penetrating Real-Time Threat Behaviour: Cyber Analytics and the Pen Tester

It’s the wild, wild west out there in cyberspace, except the feral camels[1] that once roamed Texas are the hackers, and they’re roaming beyond borders and through firewalls on the daily.

At present, cyber threat intelligence gathering is a mish-mash of intrusion detection system logs, port scans, IP addresses, information sharing platforms, Twitter feeds and traditional write-ups. There is no one consistent language used across these platforms to refer to attacks, techniques or procedures and there’s no one single source of data. Much like post-truth America, you’ve got to look in all the right places to piece together the whole story and even then it’s hard to know if you’ve put the puzzle together the way it was intended. What this means is while there’s massive complexity when trying to understand the path an attacker has taken, it also means that there’s huge potential when it comes to leveraging the data or bits (pun intended) of evidence a hacker leaves behind.

Learn to Ethically  Hack with W0m3nWh0HackM3lb0urn3 

 W0m3nWh0HackM3lb0urn3 are a community of women identified hackers who support each other to increase our skills and hack all the (legal) things.

Why?

There’s a worldwide shortage of skilled cyber security professionals and there’s a massive lack of women in the industry too. Depending on the statistics you look to, both locally here in Australia and globally, women either represent 11%  of cyber security workers according to a University of New South Wales Study, or 20% to 25% according to Cybersecurity Ventures and McAfee respectively, if you count those who do what are considered cyber security tasks more broadly.

W0m3nWh0HackM3lb0urn3 wants to change this lack of representation and needs you to make it happen. Come and join us every 1st Thursday night of the month in Melbourne from 5:30pm – 9:00pm and you can learn to hack into machines legally and not end up on the 5pm news. 

WTAF is IoT?

From space, to transport, to the design of cities, IoT is the latest acronym to sweep the cyber landscape. IoT is short for Internet of Things and was coined by Kevin Ashton in 1999.  IoT is any device, be it your phone, laptop or Raspberry Pi that is connected to the internet. And so these devices come to be known as ‘things’, especially as more things like light globesfridgeswatchesTVs and vending machines are internet enabled. Depending on your position, this is either great for business or terrible for the human proclivity towards laziness because who wouldn’t want to turn their lights off from the comfort of bed right? Business and government are particularly keen on the Internet of Things and what it can potentially do in terms of increased productivity, efficiency and citizen engagement. But the take home from many of the sessions at Melbourne’s recent IoT Festival was that many people have no idea what IoT is or how it can impact them in positive ways.

Mad, criminal or straight: Female desire in film and TV

  When it comes to representations of lesbians in film and television, sometimes they're there, mostly they’re not. And if they are, they're mostly confined to cells. The lesbian in popular culture is usually mad, criminal or she’s really, actually, heterosexual....

Gender Inequality in the IT Sector and Why it’s Bad for Business and Society

This piece focuses on diversity from a gender perspective. It recognises that the term diversity encompasses many more social categories than gender, such as, race, nationality and sexuality. However, the piece limits its discussion to gender, and specifically, to...